climate change

FERC Rejects Climate Change Study

In a move that has disappointed many, FERC has rejected a request to predict and evaluate the changes in project effects that will occur as a result of climate change that is likely to impact the local patterns of precipitation, runoff, evapo-transpiration and other meteorological patterns in two watershed in California.

States: 

Reconstructed Streamflows for the Headwaters of the Wind River, Wyoming, United States

Source: 
Journal of the American Water Resources Association
Volume: 
45-1
Year: 
2009
Abstract: 

Tree rings offer a means to extend observational records of streamflow by hundreds of years, but dendrohydrological techniques are not regularly applied to small tributary and headwaters gages. Here we explore the potential for extending three such gage records on small streams in the Wind River drainage of central Wyoming, United States. Using core samples taken from Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), pin˜ on pine (Pinus edulis), and limber pine (Pinus flexilis) at 38 sites, we were able to reconstruct streamflows for the headwaters of the Wind River back to 1672 AD or earlier. The streamflow reconstructions for Bull Lake Creek above Bull Lake; the Little Popo Agie River near Lander, Wyoming; and Wind River near Dubois, Wyoming explained between 40% and 64% of the observed variance, and these extended records performed well in a variety of statistical verification tests. The full reconstructions show pronounced inter-annual variability in streamflow, and these proxy records also point to the prevalence of severe, sustained droughts in this region.These reconstructions indicate that the 20th Century was relatively wet compared to previous centuries, and actual gage records may capture only a limited subset of potential natural variability in this area. Further analyses reveal how tree-ring based reconstructions for small tributary and headwaters gages can be strongly influenced by the length and quality of calibration records, but this work also demonstrates how the use of a spatially extensive network of tree-ring sites can improve the quality of these types of reconstructions.

Author(s): 

Thomas A. Watson, F. Anthony Barnett, Stephen T. Gray, and Glenn A. Tootle

Contact: 
Notes: 
Category: 

Climate Change and Water Resources Management: A Federal Perspective

Source: 
USGS- Circular 1331
Year: 
2009
Abstract: 

Many challenges, including climate change, face the Nation’s water managers. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has provided estimates of how climate may change, but more understanding of the processes driving the changes, the sequences of the changes, and the manifestation of these global changes at different scales could be beneficial. Since the changes will likely affect fundamental drivers of the hydrological cycle, climate change may have a large impact on water resources and water resources managers.The purpose of this interagency report prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation), and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is to explore strategies to improve water management by tracking, anticipating, and responding to climate change. This report describes the existing and still needed underpinning science crucial to addressing the many impacts of climate change on water resources management.

Author(s): 

Brekke, Levi D., Julie E. Kiang, J. Rolf Olsen, Roger S. Pulwarty, David A. Raff, D. Phil Turnipseed, Robert S. Webb, and Kathleen D. White  

Contact: 
Notes: 

The US Economic Impacts of Climate Change and the Costs of Inaction

Source: 
Center for Integrative Environmental Research (CIER)
Year: 
2007
Abstract: 

This report presents a review of economic studies for the United States and relates them to predicted impacts of climate change. The summary findings are organized by region and identify the key sectors likely affected by climate change, the main impacts to be expected, as well as estimates of costs. The report builds on the 2000 Global Change Research Program National Assessment, using additional regional and local studies, as well as new calculations derived from federal, state and industry data sources. From this review and quantification, five key lessons emerge:

  1. Economic impacts of climate change will occurthroughout the country
  2. Economic impacts will be unevenly distributedacross regions and within the economy andsociety.
  3. Negative climate impacts will outweighbenefits for most sectors that provide essentialgoods and services to society.
  4. Climate change impacts will place immensestrains on public sector budgets.
  5. Secondary effects of climate impacts caninclude higher prices, reduced income and joblosses.
Author(s): 

Ruth, Matthias, Roy F. Weston, Dana Coelho, and Daria Karetnikov

Contact: 

cier at umd dot edu

Notes: 

The full report is available for free download at https://www.cier.umd.edu/climateadaptation/

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