fisheries

Uncertainty and Instream Flow Standards

Volume: 
Vol. 21(8) 20-21
Year: 
1996
Abstract: 

This essay highlights the necessity for the establishment of new instream flow standards, as well as the revision of existing standards. This presents a problem since the standards themselves cannot be defined scientifically. The authors recommend the implementation of an adaptive management program involving three elements; setting conservative interim standards; establishment of an adequate monitoring program involving active manipulation flows; and establishment of effective procedure to revise the interim standards. The program details should vary from case to case, especially for species like salmon, where adult populations depend on a myriad of factors, not simply instream flows. Examples of current and previous uses of these standards are given.

Author(s): 

Castleberry, D.T., Cech Jr., J.J., Erman, D.C.

Contact: 
Notes: 

American Rivers produced abstract

Category: 

The (in)Significance of Atlantic Salmon

Volume: 
Fall/Winter 1996
Year: 
1996
Abstract: 

historical review and archeologic investigation into the abundance of Atlantic Salmon in pre-colonial/prehistoric New England. Prehistoric archeological record indicates virtual absence of atlantic salmon in the region. In order to investigate a climatically induced hypothesis for salmon appearance and disappearance, environmental an dclimatic factors affecting range shifts and the mechanisms of migration in salmon were studied. Atlnatic salmon are likely to be verey recent colonizers to North America, particlarly to New England. Today's fish an dwildlife managers appear to have largely ignored the paleoenvironmental databases that present long-term records of climatic change in concert with animal and plant species range changes, and even total extinctions

Author(s): 

Carlson, C.G.

Contact: 
Notes: 

American Rivers produced abstract

Category: 

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