relicensing

Economic Analysis for Hydropower Project Relicensing: Guidance and Alternative Methods

Source: 
USFWS
Year: 
1998
Abstract: 

This report is intended to help Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) staff become more effective participants in the hydropower relicensing process through a better understanding of the economic analysis used to evaluate hydropower projects. Specifically, the report seeks to accomplish the following goals:

  • Explain the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's (FERC's) current approach to the economic analysis of relicensing alternatives;
  • Review potential methodological refinements and why they are important; and
  • Introduce a variety of approaches for assessing non-power values, helping FWS staff recognize when more advanced analyses are applicable.

The purpose of this document is not to provide a step-by-step guide for the conduct of primary economic analysis, i.e., the reader is not expected to become an expert in the implementation of the analyses described here. Rather, the document seeks to attune non-experts to the role of economics in relicensing and the diversity of techniques available. 

Author(s): 

Black, Robert, Bruce McKenney, Robert Unsworth, Nicholas Flores

Contact: 
Notes: 
Category: 

The Contribution of Non-market Valuation to Policy: The Case of Nonfederal Hyropower Relicensing

Year: 
2008
Abstract: 

The contribution of nonmarket valuation studies to decisions about the operation of nonfederal hydroelectric facilities is examined. Hydropower licensing reforms by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to better weigh market and nonmarket tradeoffs did not require or use nonmarket valuation. License negotiation processes are interpreted as a substitute for valuation. 

Author(s): 

Kurt Stephenson and Leonard Shabman

Contact: 
Notes: 
Category: 

Sources of Bureaucratic Delay: A Case Study of FERC Dam Relicensing

Source: 
The Journal of Law, Economics, & Organization
Volume: 
22
Year: 
2005
Abstract: 

This paper investigates the sources for regulatory delay in bureaucratic decision making, testing regulatory capture, congressional dominance, and bureaucratic discretion theories of agency behavior.

The empirical context concerns relicenses issued by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) for hydroelectric dams, which have taken anywhere from just ten months to over sixteen years to be issued. The reasons for this heterogeneity in regulatory processing times can be expected to be varied and numerous and indeed we find evidence that outside interest groups, the legislature, and bureaucratic discretion are all significant in affecting regulatory processing times. Our most intriguing results concern the effects of environmental interest groups, which, despite their apparent benefit/cost motivation to hasten the relicensing process (independent of relicensing outcomes), overall end up slowing it down.

Author(s): 

Lea-Rachel D. Kosnik

Contact: 
Notes: 
Category: 
Key Words: 

Complying with the FERC

Volume: 
September 1990
Year: 
1990
Abstract: 

In two waves of proposed penalty notices, FERC has affirmed its readiness to enforce its new strict hydropower license compliance policy. Failure to take notice of this trend could have dire consequences for the industry. FERC's new compliance ethic is based on the threat of two penalties which can be imposed on non-compliant licensees, exemptees or permit holders. First is the civil penalties provision inserted into the Federal Power Act by enactment of the Electric Consumers Protection Act of 1986. Second, FERC can terminate licenses, exemptions, permits and fail to relicense projects with a history of non-compliance. According to FERC, the existence of a positive compliance record will be a major consideration in relicensing hydroelectric projects in the future.
NOTE: this article from 1990!

Author(s): 

Lagassa, G.

Contact: 
Notes: 
Category: 

Pages