geomorphology

Influence of Small Dams on Downstream Channel Characterstics in Pennsylvania and Maryland

Source: 
Journal of the American Water Resource Association
Volume: 
45-1
Year: 
2009
Abstract: 

We evaluate the effects of small dams (11 of 15 sites less than 4 m high) on downstream channels at 15 sites in Maryland and Pennsylvania by using a reach upstream of the reservoir at each site to represent the downstream reach before dam construction. A semi-quantitative geomorphic characterization demonstrates that upstream reaches occupy similar geomorphic settings as downstream reaches. Survey data indicate that dams have had no measurable influence on the water surface slope, width, and the percentages of exposed bedrockor boulders on the streambed.The median grain diameter (D50) is increased slightly by dam construction,but D50 remains within the pebble size class. The percentage of sand and silt and clay on the bed averages about 35% before dam construction, but typically decreases to around 20% after dam construction. The presence of thedam has therefore only influenced the fraction of finer-grained sediment on the bed, and has not caused other measurable changes in fluvial morphology.The absence of measurable geomorphic change from dam impacts is explicable given the extent of geologic control at these study sites. We speculate that potential changes that could have been induced by dam construction have been resisted by inerodible bedrock, relatively immobile boulders, well-vegetated and cohesive banks, and low rates of bed material supply and transport.If the dams of our study are removed, we argue that long-term changes (those that remain after a period of transient adjustment)will be limited to increases in the percentage of sand and silt and clay on the bed. Thus, dam removal instreams similar to those of our study area should not result in significant long-term geomorphic changes.

Author(s): 

Katherine Skalak, James Pizzuto, and David D. Hart

Contact: 
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Morphological and sedimentological changes in a gravel-bed river following 12 years of flow regulation of hydropower

Volume: 
Vol. 10( ) 247-264
Year: 
1995
Abstract: 

The flow regime of the gravel-bedded river North Tyne has been regulated by the Kielder reservoir for the past 12 years; for the past nine years, regulation has been dominated by hydropower generation. Diurnal stage fluctuations of up to 0.6m are experienced during periods of peak hydropower flows. The main morphological and sedimentological impacts of this regulation are identified and physical explanations provided for the observed adjustments. The main morphological adjustments are identified as the degradation of riffle spawning grounds, the development of fine ssediment berms along channel margins, the aggradation of pools, vegetation of former gravel shoals and the growth of tributary confluence bars. Sedimentological adjustments are subtle and are characterized by higher percentages of fines within spawning gravels, coarsening of surface gravels and the development of a stable, strong bed fabric. The physical explanations for these adjustments relate to changes in the sediment transport regime controlled by the hydraulics associated with the pool-riffle swquence during hydropower generation

Author(s): 

Sear , D.A.

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Exploring how disturbance is transmitted upstream: going against the flow

Volume: 
Vol. 16(2) 425-438
Year: 
1997
Abstract: 

Modifications of lower watersheds such as water abstraction, channel modification, land-use changes, nutrient enrichment, and toxic discharge can set off a cascade of events upstream that are often overlooked. This oversight is of particular concern since most rivers are altered by humans in their lower drainages and most published ecological investigations of lotic systems have focused on headwater streams. Factors contributing to ecological processes or biophysical legacies in upper watersheds often go unacknowledged because they occur at disparate geographic locations downstream (e.g., gravel mining, water abstraction, dams) with significant lag times. This paper considers examples of how alterations to streams and rivers in their lower reaches can produce biophysical legacies in upstream reaches on levels from genes to ecosystems. Examples include: 1) genetic- and species-level changes, such as reduced genetic flow and variation in isolated upstream populations; 2) populations-and community-level changes that occur when degraded downstream areas act as population "sinks" for "source" populations of native species upstream or, conversely, as "source" populations of exotic species that migrate upstream; and 3) ecosystem-and landscape-level changes (e.g., nutrient cycling, primary productivity, regional patterns of biodiversity) that can occur in headwater systems as a result of downstream habitat deterioration and hydrologic modifications. Finally, a case study from my own research illustrates the importance of careful consideration of downstream-upstream linkages in formulating research questions, designing experiments, making predictions, and interpreting results. The effects of dams and associated water abstraction in lowland streams of Puerto Rico has forced my colleagues and me to re-evaluate the results of ecological research that we have conducted in highland streams over the past decade and to redirect our research that we have conducted in highland streams over the past decade and to redirect our research to consider downstream-upstream linkages.

Author(s): 

Pringle , C.M.

Contact: 

Pringle, Catherine, Inst. Of Ecology, Univ. of Georgia, Inst. Of Ecology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, 30602-0000

Notes: 
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Downstream ecological effects of dams: a geomorphic perspective

Volume: 
Vol. 45(3) 183-192
Year: 
1995
Abstract: 

The goal of this article is to illustrate a geomorphically based approach to understanding and reducing some of the cataclysmic effects of dams on downstream riverine ecosystems. Additionally, we hope to provoke debate on the merits of different approaches to river conservation. We suggest that geomorphic studies directed at ecologically significant features of river morphology and hydraulics may sometimes be more valuable in short-term evaluations associated with the environmental assessment of new dams or the relicensing of existing dams. We believe that more often than has been realized, geomorphological changes are the key to understanding the long-term ecological consequences of dams and other stream disturbances. We also have some reservations about the efficacyof biological research in short-term studies to lead to successful management plans. The biological research necessary to develop a management plans is substantial--often a multiyear undertaking--and may not lead to a clear understanding of improtant features affecting the ecosystem.

Author(s): 

Ligon , F.K. , Dietrich , W.E., Trush , W.J.

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