monitoring

The Disconnect Between Restoration Goals and Practices: A Case Study of Watershed Restoration in the Russian River Basin, CA

Source: 
Restoration Ecology
Volume: 
18
Year: 
2008
Abstract: 

Over the past two decades, watershed restoration has dramatically increased internationally. California has been at the forefront, allocating billions of dollars to restoration activities through legislation and voter-approved bonds. Yet, the implications of restoration remain ambiguous because there has been little examination of restoration accomplishments and almost no analysis of the political context of restoration. This article addresses these gaps, utilizing a case study of the Russian River basin in Northern California. We identify trends that shed light on both the ecological and the political implications of restoration at a basin scale by examining a database of 787 restoration projects implemented in the Russian River basin since the early 1980s. Although a total of over $47 million has been spent on restoration in the basin, dominant forms of restoration are limited in scope to small-scale projects that focus on technical solutions to site-specific problems. The majority of restoration efforts are devoted to road repair, riparian stabilization, and in-stream structures, accounting for 62% of all projects. These types of projects do not address the broader social drivers of watershed change such as land and water uses. We suggest that restoration can become more effective by addressing the entire watershed as a combination of social and ecological forces that interact to produce watershed conditions. 

Author(s): 

Juliet Christian-Smith and Merenlender, Adina M.

Contact: 
Notes: 

The Disconnect Between Restoration Goals and Practices: A Case Study of Watershed Restoration in the Russian River Basin, CA

Source: 
Restoration Ecology
Year: 
2008
Abstract: 

Over the past two decades, watershed restoration has dramatically increased internationally. California has been atthe forefront, allocating billions of dollars to restoration activities through legislation and voter-approved bonds. Yet, the implications of restoration remain ambiguous because there has been little examination of restoration accomplishments and almost no analysis of the political context of restoration. This article addresses these gaps, utilizing a case study of the Russian River basin in Northern California. We identify trends that shed light on both the ecological and the political implications of restoration at a basin scale by examining a database of 787 restoration projects implemented in the Russian River basin since the early 1980s. Although a total of over $47 million has been spent on restoration in the basin, dominant forms of restoration are limited in scope to small-scale projects that focus on technical solutions to site-specific problems. The majority of restoration efforts are devoted to road repair,riparian stabilization, and in-stream structures, accounting for 62% of all projects. These types of projects do not address the broader social drivers of watershed change such as land and water uses. We suggest that restoration can become more effective by addressing the entire watershed as a combination of social and ecological forces that interact to produce watershed conditions. 

Author(s): 

Christian-Smith, Julie and Adina M. Merenlender

Contact: 
Notes: 

A Comparitive Study of Stream-gaging Techniques for Low-flow Measurements in Two Virginia Tributaries

Source: 
Journal of the American Water Resources Association
Volume: 
45-1
Year: 
2009
Abstract: 

Nonpoint source pollution (NPS) studies, such as total maximum daily loads development, often require quantification of flow in small first-order and second-order streams. Frequently, stream-gaging techniques are implemented in flows that are below the manufacturer’s recommended minimum velocity. A comparative analysis of the accuracy of current technologies used in NPS pollution stream-gaging applications and their applicability in low-flow conditions was conducted. Nine stream-gaging methods were evaluated for their field and laboratory performance and control structures were used as the statistical control. Analysis of the field investigation data indicated that Marsh McBirney current meter and the One-orange method were the most accurate in the field while the results of the laboratory experiments found that the Starflow acoustic Doppler and Valeport Braystoke current meter performed best among the 10 methods. Overall, the Marsh McBirney and Valeport Braystoke current meters exhibited the best performance for both field and laboratory situations. 

Author(s): 

Michelle L. Soupir, Saied Mostaghimi, and C.E. Mitchem, Jr 

Contact: 
Notes: 
Category: 

Biological integrity: a long-neglected aspect of water resource management

Volume: 
Vol. 1(1) 66-84
Year: 
1991
Abstract: 

Water of sufficient quality and quantity is critical to all life. Increasing human population and growth of technology require human society to devote more and more attention to protection of adequate supplies of water. Although perception of biological degradation stimulated current state and federal legislation on the quality of water resources, that biological focus was lost in the search for easily measured physical and chemical surrogates. The "fishable and swimmable" goal of the Water Pollution Control Act of 1972 (PL 92-500) and its charge to "restore and maintain" biotic integrity illustrate that law's biological underpinning. Further, the need for operational definitions of terms like "biological integrity" and "unreasonable degradation" and for ecologically sound tools to measure divergence from societal goals have increased interest in biological monitoring. Assessment of water resource quality by sampling biological communities in the field (ambient biological monitoring) is a promising approach that requires expanded use of ecological expertise. One such approach, the Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI), provides a broadly based, multiparameter tool for the assessment of biotic integrity in running waters. IBI based on fish community attributes has now been applied widely in North America. The success of IBI has stimulated the development of similar approaches suing other aquatic taxa. Expanded use of ecological expertise in ambient biological monitoring is essential to the protection of water resources. Ecologists have the expertise to contribute significantly to those programs.

Author(s): 

Karr, J.R.

Contact: 
Notes: 
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