sediment transport

Influence of Small Dams on Downstream Channel Characterstics in Pennsylvania and Maryland

Source: 
Journal of the American Water Resource Association
Volume: 
45-1
Year: 
2009
Abstract: 

We evaluate the effects of small dams (11 of 15 sites less than 4 m high) on downstream channels at 15 sites in Maryland and Pennsylvania by using a reach upstream of the reservoir at each site to represent the downstream reach before dam construction. A semi-quantitative geomorphic characterization demonstrates that upstream reaches occupy similar geomorphic settings as downstream reaches. Survey data indicate that dams have had no measurable influence on the water surface slope, width, and the percentages of exposed bedrockor boulders on the streambed.The median grain diameter (D50) is increased slightly by dam construction,but D50 remains within the pebble size class. The percentage of sand and silt and clay on the bed averages about 35% before dam construction, but typically decreases to around 20% after dam construction. The presence of thedam has therefore only influenced the fraction of finer-grained sediment on the bed, and has not caused other measurable changes in fluvial morphology.The absence of measurable geomorphic change from dam impacts is explicable given the extent of geologic control at these study sites. We speculate that potential changes that could have been induced by dam construction have been resisted by inerodible bedrock, relatively immobile boulders, well-vegetated and cohesive banks, and low rates of bed material supply and transport.If the dams of our study are removed, we argue that long-term changes (those that remain after a period of transient adjustment)will be limited to increases in the percentage of sand and silt and clay on the bed. Thus, dam removal instreams similar to those of our study area should not result in significant long-term geomorphic changes.

Author(s): 

Katherine Skalak, James Pizzuto, and David D. Hart

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Sediment transport-storage relations for degrading, gravel bed channels

Volume: 
Vol. 38: doi:10.1029/2001WR001086
Year: 
2002
Abstract: 

In a drainage network, sediment is transferred through a series of channel/valley segments(natural sediment storage reservoirs) that aredistinguished fromtheir neighbors by their particular capacity to store and transport sediment. We propose that the sediment transport capacityof each reservoirisa unique positivefunctionof storage volume, which influences sediment mobility and availability through variations in bed surface texture, channel gradient, and availability of valley floor sediments for erosion. Examinations of the form of transport-storage relations of degrading alluvial reservoirs using published field studies, flume experiments, and simulations support a conceptual model that includes two phases. In phase I, filled channels respond to variations in supply primarily by changes in stored sediment volume, with little change in transport rate. In phase II, channel mobility is responsive to supply through armoring and form roughness. Although these phases couldrepresent idealized transport-limited(phase1)orsupply-limited(phase
II) states, we propose that every alluvial reservoir responds to changes in sediment inputs by changing both storage and transport rate, the propensity for either depending on reservoir characteristics and the sediment exchange processes in the channel. Transport-storage relations for phase II are approximately linear, but examination of numerical simulations and flume experiments indicates that armoring imparts positive curvature. Simulations of degradation of an alluvial reservoir with channel and valley floor surfaces indicate that interactions between channel lowering and lateral erosion are critical in the manifestation of a transport-storage relation. Better knowledge of transport

Author(s): 

Lisle , T.E. , Church , M.

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Geomorphic response to river flow regulation: case studies and time-scales

Volume: 
Vol. 11( ) 3-22
Year: 
1995
Abstract: 

River regulation imposes primary changes on flow and sediment transfer, the principal factors governing the alluvial channel regime. In this study, the effect of flow regulation is isolated from sediment delivery. Peace River was regulated in 1967 for hydropower. The gravel-bed reach immediately downstream from the dam has become stable. Gravel accumulates at major tributary junctions, so the river profile is becoming stepped. Further downstream, the river has a sand bed. It can still transport sand, so morphological changes along the channel include both aggradation and channel narrowing by lateral aggradation. In the gravel-bed Kemano River, the addition of water by diversion from another river caused degradation when additional bed material was entrained below the inflow point. However, the effect became evident only after many years, when a competent flood occurred. The short-term response was channel widening. The time-scale for the response depends on the size of the river and the nature and severity of regulation. In both rivers, significant adjustment will require centuries and will intimately involve the riparian forest.

Author(s): 

Church, M.

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