river restoration

Agreement Paves Way For a Healthy Klamath River

A draft agreement, known as the Klamath Hydroelectric Settlement Agreement (KHSA) that may lead to the removal of four Klamath River dams, was released earlier this week.

The Hydroelectric Agreement also includes provisions for the interim operation of the dams and the process to transfer, decommission, and remove the dams.

According to the Department of Interior, the Agreement lays out the process for additional studies, environmental review, and a decision by the Secretary of the Interior regarding whether:

Dam Removal Success Stories

Year: 
1999
Abstract: 

This report prepared by American Rivers, Friends of the Earth and Trout Unlimited in 1999 describes the concept of dam removal and discusses the brief history of dam removal in the United States until then. Case studies of dam removal in many states are also discussed.According to the report, until 1999, states with the most recorded removals were Wisconsin (73 dams), California (47 dams), Ohio (39 dams), Pennsylvania (38dams), and Tennessee (25 dams).   

Author(s): 

American Rivers, Friends of the Earth and Trout Unlimited 

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A Collaborative and Adaptive Process for Developing Environmental Flow Recommendations

Source: 
River Research and Applications
Volume: 
22
Year: 
2006
Abstract: 

Many river restoration projects are focusing on restoring environmental flow regimes to improve ecosystem health in rivers that have been developed for water supply, hydropower generation, flood control, navigation, and other purposes. In efforts to prevent future ecological damage, water supply planners in some parts of the world are beginning to address the water needs of river ecosystems proactively by reserving some portion of river flows for ecosystem support. These restorative and protective actions require development of scientifically credible estimates of environmental flow needs. This paper describes an adaptive, inter-disciplinary, science-based process for developing environmental flow recommendations. It has been designed for use in a variety of water management activities, including flow restoration projects, and can be tailored according to available time and resources for determining environmental flow needs. The five-step process includes: (1) an orientation meeting; (2) a literature review and summary of existing knowledge about flow-dependent biota and ecological processes of concern; (3) a workshop to develop ecological objectives and initial flow recommendations, and identify key information gaps; (4) implementation of the flow recommendations on a trial basis to test hypotheses and reduce uncertainties; and (5) monitoring system response and conducting further research as warranted. A range of recommended flows are developed for the low flows in each month, high flow pulses throughout the year, and floods with targeted inter-annual frequencies. We describe an application of this process to the Savannah River, in which the resultant flow recommendations were incorporated into a comprehensive river basin planning process conducted by the Corps of Engineers, and used to initiate the adaptive management of Thurmond Dam. 

Author(s): 

BRIAN D. RICHTER, ANDREW T. WARNER, JUDY L. MEYER and KIM LUTZ

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American Rivers Accepting River Restoration Proposals

American Rivers recently announced the opening of the American Rivers-NOAA grant for 2009 for river restoration projects. According to American Rivers, since 2001, this partnership has provided technical and financial assistance to community based projects that aim to restore fish species by removal of stream barriers such as dams.

Grant proposals will be accepted for projects in the Northeast, Mid-Atlantic, Northwest and California only.

The deadline for submitting applications is December 3, 2008.

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