water policy

Climate Change and Water Resources Management: A Federal Perspective

Source: 
USGS- Circular 1331
Year: 
2009
Abstract: 

Many challenges, including climate change, face the Nation’s water managers. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has provided estimates of how climate may change, but more understanding of the processes driving the changes, the sequences of the changes, and the manifestation of these global changes at different scales could be beneficial. Since the changes will likely affect fundamental drivers of the hydrological cycle, climate change may have a large impact on water resources and water resources managers.The purpose of this interagency report prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation), and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is to explore strategies to improve water management by tracking, anticipating, and responding to climate change. This report describes the existing and still needed underpinning science crucial to addressing the many impacts of climate change on water resources management.

Author(s): 

Brekke, Levi D., Julie E. Kiang, J. Rolf Olsen, Roger S. Pulwarty, David A. Raff, D. Phil Turnipseed, Robert S. Webb, and Kathleen D. White  

Contact: 
Notes: 

Demolish It and They Will Come: Estimating the Economic Impacts of Restoring A Recreational Fishery

Source: 
Journal of the American Water Resources Association
Volume: 
44 (6)
Year: 
2008
Abstract: 

This paper presents the results of an ex post survey of recreational anglers for the lower Kennebec River, post-Edwards Dam removal. To the best of our knowledge, this study represents one of the first ex post analyses of fisheries restoration from dam removal. We find significant benefits have accrued to anglers using the restored fishery. Specifically, anglers are spending more to visit the fishery, a direct indication of the increased value anglers place on the improved fishery. Anglers are also willing to pay for increased angling opportunities on the river. These findings have policy implications for other privately owned dams that are currently undergoing relicensing and ⁄ or dam removal considerations. Our findings may also hold implications for fisheries that have deteriorated due to historic dam construction.  

Author(s): 

Robbins, Jesse Lance and Lynne Y. Lewis

Contact: 
Notes: