Streamflow

Seasonal Streamflow Forecasting in the Columbia River Basin

Source: 
Waterpower XVi
Year: 
2009
Abstract: 

Climate and hydrologic fluctuations in the Pacific Northwest lead to large year-to-year variations in the strength of the Columbia River hydropower resource. We describe and present results from a seasonal hydrologic prediction system for the Columbia River basin that gives insight into the seasons-ahead behavior of this resource starting near the beginning of each water year. The forecast system is based on the real-time application of a state-of-the-science, macroscale hydrologic model coupled with ensemble climate forecasts. Estimates of initial land surface conditions, primarily in the form of snow water equivalent, are improved via the assimilation of snowpack observations, and forecast biases are reduced through statistical forecast calibration. The forecast system produces graphical forecast products designed to help water and energy managers understand the current state of the Columbia River basin, the climate outlook for the water year, and the implications of both for future streamflow. 

Author(s): 

Andy Wood, Matt Wiley, Bart Nijssen

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Reconstructed Streamflows for the Headwaters of the Wind River, Wyoming, United States

Source: 
Journal of the American Water Resources Association
Volume: 
45-1
Year: 
2009
Abstract: 

Tree rings offer a means to extend observational records of streamflow by hundreds of years, but dendrohydrological techniques are not regularly applied to small tributary and headwaters gages. Here we explore the potential for extending three such gage records on small streams in the Wind River drainage of central Wyoming, United States. Using core samples taken from Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), pin˜ on pine (Pinus edulis), and limber pine (Pinus flexilis) at 38 sites, we were able to reconstruct streamflows for the headwaters of the Wind River back to 1672 AD or earlier. The streamflow reconstructions for Bull Lake Creek above Bull Lake; the Little Popo Agie River near Lander, Wyoming; and Wind River near Dubois, Wyoming explained between 40% and 64% of the observed variance, and these extended records performed well in a variety of statistical verification tests. The full reconstructions show pronounced inter-annual variability in streamflow, and these proxy records also point to the prevalence of severe, sustained droughts in this region.These reconstructions indicate that the 20th Century was relatively wet compared to previous centuries, and actual gage records may capture only a limited subset of potential natural variability in this area. Further analyses reveal how tree-ring based reconstructions for small tributary and headwaters gages can be strongly influenced by the length and quality of calibration records, but this work also demonstrates how the use of a spatially extensive network of tree-ring sites can improve the quality of these types of reconstructions.

Author(s): 

Thomas A. Watson, F. Anthony Barnett, Stephen T. Gray, and Glenn A. Tootle

Contact: 
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Using SWAT to Model Streamflow in Two River Basins With Ground and Satellite Precipitation Data

Source: 
Journal of the American Water Resource Association
Volume: 
45-1
Year: 
2009
Abstract: 

Both ground rain gauge and remotely sensed precipitation (Next Generation Weather Radar - NEXRAD Stage III) data have been used to support spatially distributed hydrological modeling. This study is unique in that it utilizes and compares the performance of National Weather Service (NWS) rain gauge, NEXRADStage III, and Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) 3B42 (Version 6) data for the hydrological modeling of the Middle Nueces River Watershed in South Texas and Middle Rio Grande Watershed in South Texas and northern Mexico. The hydrologic model chosen for this study is the Soil and Water Assessment Tool(SWAT), which is a comprehensive, physical-based tool that models watershed hydrology and water quality within stream reaches. Minor adjustments to selected model parameters were applied to make parameter values more realistic based on results from previous studies. In both watersheds, NEXRAD Stage III data yields results with low mass balance error between simulated and actual streamflow (±13%) and high monthly Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency coefficients (NS > 0.60) for both calibration (July 1, 2003 to December 31, 2006) and validation(2007) periods. In the Middle Rio Grande Watershed NEXRAD Stage III data also yield robust daily results(time averaged over a three-day period) with NS values of (0.60-0.88). TRMM 3B42 data generate simulations for the Middle Rio Grande Watershed of variable quality (MBE = +13 to )16%; NS = 0.38-0.94; RMSE = 0.07-0.65), but greatly overestimates streamflow during the calibration period in the Middle Nueces Watershed.During the calibration period use of NWS rain gauge data does not generate acceptable simulations in both watersheds. Significantly, our study is the first to successfully demonstrate the utility of satellite-estimated precipitation (TRMM 3B42) in supporting hydrologic modeling with SWAT; thereby, potentially extending therealm (between 50 degree North and 50 degrees South) where remotely sensed precipitation data can support hydrologic modeling outside of regions that have modern, ground-based radar networks (i.e., much of the third world).

Author(s): 

Kenneth J. Tobin and Marvin E. Bennett

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