Science/Ecology

Measuring stream temperature with digital data loggers: a user

Volume: 
General Technical Report RMRSGTR-150WWW
Year: 
2005
Abstract: 

Digital data loggers (thermographs) are among the most widespread instruments in use for monitoring physical conditions in aquatic ecosystems. The intent of this protocol is to provide guidelines for selecting and programming data loggers, sampling water temperatures in the field, data screening and analysis, and data archiving.

Author(s): 

Dunham, J., Chandler, G., Rieman, B.,D. Martin

Contact: 

U.S. Forest Service

Notes: 
Category: 

Forgotten linkages: Effects of mainstem hydrologic alteration on tributary connectivity, habitat, and biota

Year: 
2002
Abstract: 

Hydrologic alteration is indisputably the most cited cause of species decline in aquatic systems. Most studies focus on the longitudinal impacts of dam construction and operation, but few examine the impact of flow alteration on tributaries. Consequently, tributary habitat and fauna are often overlooked in management processes involving mainstem projects. Most tributary impacts fall into two categories described by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA): direct effects and cumulative impacts. This review summarizes the issues that are most pervasive in the literature, provides specific examples of known effects, and integrates complex ecological aspects relecant to the hydropower relicensing process.

Author(s): 

Duncan, William W.

Contact: 
Notes: 
Category: 

Identifying sources of stress to native aquatic fauna using a watershed ecological risk assessment framework

Volume: 
Vol. 35, pp. 4711-4718
Year: 
2001
Abstract: 

The purpose of the paper is to test the applicability of rish assessment at a watershed scale; in this case, to see if anthropogenic effects on threatened fish and mussel populations can be identified following EPA guidance for risk assessment.

Author(s): 

Diamond, J.M., Serveiss, V.B.

Contact: 
Notes: 
Category: 

Life in the fast lane: fish and foodweb structure in the main channel of large rivers

Volume: 
Vol. 20(2), pp. 255-265
Year: 
2001
Abstract: 

The RCC, FPC, and RPM are all inadequate for understanding the main channel as a functioning foodweb. The purpose of the paper is to provide data on fish habitat and food preferences in large rivers, connect the main channel's relationship to fish and other habitats, and to describe the main channel foodweb. The studies were carried out on the Illinois River and the Upper Mississippi River.

Author(s): 

Dettmers, J.M., Wahl, D.H., Soluk, D.A.

Contact: 
Notes: 

abstract only

Category: 

Pages