Policy/Law

Dam Removal and Historic Preservation: Reconciling Dual Objectives

Source: 
AR
Year: 
2008
Abstract: 

Too often advocates for river restoration through dam removal find themselves in the middle of a project and at odds with potential partners over matters of historic preservation. The goal of Dam Removal and Historic Preservation: Reconciling Dual Objectives is to help dam removal proponents and advocates for historic preservation work together more effectively to achieve their mutual goals, while building constructive relationships and successfully reconciling potentially competing objectives. This report combines a primer on Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act with methods for avoiding, minimizing, or mitigating the adverse effects of a dam removal project and concludes with real life case studies.Available online at https://www.americanrivers.org/site/DocServer/Dam_Removal_and_Historic_P... 

Author(s): 

Serena McClain, Stephanie Lindloff and Katherine Baer

Contact: 
Notes: 

Offering Public Access While Maintaining Security

Source: 
Hydro Review
Year: 
2005
Abstract: 

The events of September 11, 2001 caused a shift in thinking about public access at hydro facilities, but the need to provide recreation remains. A Federal Energy Regulatory Commission team works to help owners keep their projects secure while still providing essential public access. 

Author(s): 

Heather E. Campbell & Frank Calcagno, Jr.

Contact: 
Notes: 
Category: 

Stationarity is Dead: Whither Water Management?

Source: 
Science
Volume: 
319
Year: 
2008
Abstract: 

Systems for management of water throughout the developed world have been designed and operated under the assumption of stationarity. Stationarity-the idea that natural systems fluctuate within an unchanging envelope of variability-is a foundational concept that permeates trainingand practice in water-resource engineering. It implies that any variable (e.g., annual streamflow or annual flood peak) has a time-invariant(or 1-year-periodic) probability density function (pdf), whose properties can be estimated from the instrument record. Under stationarity, pdf estimation errors are acknowledged, but have been assumed to be reducible by additional observations, more efficient estimators, or regional or paleohydrologic data. The pdfs, in turn, are used to evaluateand manage risks to water supplies, waterworks, and floodplains; annual global investment in water infrastructure exceeds U.S.$500 billion. 

Author(s): 

P. C. D. Milly, Julio Betancourt, Malin Falkenmark, Robert M. Hirsch, Zbigniew W.Kundzewicz, Dennis P. Lettenmaier, Ronald J. Stouffer

Contact: 
Notes: 

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