Economic

Economic Analysis for Hydropower Project Relicensing: Guidance and Alternative Methods

Source: 
USFWS
Year: 
1998
Abstract: 

This report is intended to help Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) staff become more effective participants in the hydropower relicensing process through a better understanding of the economic analysis used to evaluate hydropower projects. Specifically, the report seeks to accomplish the following goals:

  • Explain the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's (FERC's) current approach to the economic analysis of relicensing alternatives;
  • Review potential methodological refinements and why they are important; and
  • Introduce a variety of approaches for assessing non-power values, helping FWS staff recognize when more advanced analyses are applicable.

The purpose of this document is not to provide a step-by-step guide for the conduct of primary economic analysis, i.e., the reader is not expected to become an expert in the implementation of the analyses described here. Rather, the document seeks to attune non-experts to the role of economics in relicensing and the diversity of techniques available. 

Author(s): 

Black, Robert, Bruce McKenney, Robert Unsworth, Nicholas Flores

Contact: 
Notes: 
Category: 

The US Economic Impacts of Climate Change and the Costs of Inaction

Source: 
Center for Integrative Environmental Research (CIER)
Year: 
2007
Abstract: 

This report presents a review of economic studies for the United States and relates them to predicted impacts of climate change. The summary findings are organized by region and identify the key sectors likely affected by climate change, the main impacts to be expected, as well as estimates of costs. The report builds on the 2000 Global Change Research Program National Assessment, using additional regional and local studies, as well as new calculations derived from federal, state and industry data sources. From this review and quantification, five key lessons emerge:

  1. Economic impacts of climate change will occurthroughout the country
  2. Economic impacts will be unevenly distributedacross regions and within the economy andsociety.
  3. Negative climate impacts will outweighbenefits for most sectors that provide essentialgoods and services to society.
  4. Climate change impacts will place immensestrains on public sector budgets.
  5. Secondary effects of climate impacts caninclude higher prices, reduced income and joblosses.
Author(s): 

Ruth, Matthias, Roy F. Weston, Dana Coelho, and Daria Karetnikov

Contact: 

cier at umd dot edu

Notes: 

The full report is available for free download at https://www.cier.umd.edu/climateadaptation/

The Contribution of Non-market Valuation to Policy: The Case of Nonfederal Hyropower Relicensing

Year: 
2008
Abstract: 

The contribution of nonmarket valuation studies to decisions about the operation of nonfederal hydroelectric facilities is examined. Hydropower licensing reforms by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to better weigh market and nonmarket tradeoffs did not require or use nonmarket valuation. License negotiation processes are interpreted as a substitute for valuation. 

Author(s): 

Kurt Stephenson and Leonard Shabman

Contact: 
Notes: 
Category: 

Dams, Dam Removal, and River Restoration: A Hedonic Property Value Analysis

Source: 
Contemporary Economic Policy
Volume: 
26 No. 2
Year: 
2008
Abstract: 

This article presents the results of a hedonic property value analysis for multiple hydropower sites along the Kennebec River in Maine, including the former site of the Edwards Dam in Augusta, Maine. The effect of the removal of the Edwards Dam on the Kennebec River in Maine is examined through consumer's marginal willingness to pay to be close to or distant from the dam site. Data from both before and after the dam was removed are used to estimate changes in marginal prices. A similar data set is also used to look at the effects of the remaining upstream dams on property values.This article presents one of the first (to our knowledge) ex post analyses on the economic impact of dam removal on property values. As more privately owned dams in the United States come up for relicensing, evaluating the impacts with and without the dam will become increasingly important. This work can help inform those analyses. 

Author(s): 

Lynne Y. Lewis, Curtis Bohlen and Sarah Wilson

Contact: 
Notes: 
Category: 

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