collaborative settlement

Dams: here today, gone tomorrow? Positive signs of change at FERC

Volume: 
July 1994 p13
Year: 
1994
Abstract: 

FERC has made great strides recently soliciting public input on whether they can and should "consider decommissioning of a project as an alternative to issuing a new license." Also, FERC has asked for input on how cumulative impacts of hydro porjects in the same reiver basin should be addressed. In respone to this request, various NGOs have weighed in with their opinion. The Hydropower Reform Coalition states FERC needs a "cradle-to-grave" approach in licensing that would fund the retirement of a hydro facility at the end of its useful lfe without burdening taxpayers. Furthermore, rather than review dams one by one, FERC should conduct river basin wide analyses, issuing licenses according to that plan.

Author(s): 

Turner , E.

Notes: 

American Rivers produced abstract

Category: 

What makes a hydropower negotiation successful?

Source: 
Hydro Review
Volume: 
August 1996 pp66-71
Year: 
1996
Abstract: 

Negotiation implies that parties try to reach an agreement that will satisfy at least some of the needs of each of the participating groups. According to analysis performed by an interdisciplinary research team at the national Biological Service, parties negotiating about hydropower licenses need seven conditions and behaviors. They are: need to negotiate; representativeness; power; technical clarity; commitment to implementation; urgency; playing by the rules. The results of our investigations--determined by analyzing six recent hydropower project licensing consultations--are presented below as a general guide to successful negotiating. 

Author(s): 

Taylor , J.G. , Lamb , B.L. . Burkardt , N.

Contact: 
Notes: 

American Rivers produced abstract

Category: 

Ecosystem Management in the United States: foreword

Volume: 
S.L. Yaffee et al (eds) Island Press
Year: 
1996
Abstract: 

Spurred by a growing recognition that many difficult environmental problems are really ecosystem problems, scientists, resource management professionals, and others were beginning to work ecological principles into public land management policy and practice. In addition to this new way of scientific thinking, a great deal of administrative attention was paid to finding new ways of resolving natural resource conflicts. Economists and administrators searched for "win-win" strategies of resource management. There were anecdotal reports of successes, but no wide ranging discussion of cooperative ecosystem management (CEM). An objective survey of CEM was commissioned by the Wilderness Society. The study was conducted in order to furnish government agencies (USDA, USFS, NPS, BLM) with information as well as to create a resource by which individuals, organizations, agencies, or corporations facing local environmental challenges could learn from the collective and individual experience of CEM projects nationwide.
While CEM appears quite promising, it is in many respects a new endeavor involving a lot of hard work. Most of the CEM projects surveyed received at least some public investment. Thus, the continued success of CEM revolves around the continued funding for programs. CEM represents a process by which more effective ecosystem protection can occur. However, we must ensure that the progress CEM has already made and the lessons CEM holds are not lost.

Author(s): 

Nelson , G.

Contact: 
Notes: 
Category: 

A framework for collaborative processes in hydropower licensing

Volume: 
Feburary 12, 1996
Year: 
1996
Abstract: 

Industrial and environmental interests are accustomed to fighting to "win" disputes over the licensing of facilities and the related management of natural resources. Such processes have their drawbacks both in terms of efficiency and the results they may produce. While regarding both efficiency and potential outcomes federal judge Henry Friendly observed "under our adversary system the role of counsel is not to make sure the truth is ascertained but to advance his clients cause by any ethical means ... Causing delay and sowing confusion not only are his right but may be his duty."
Thus, increasingly both environmental and developmental interests have realized how unwieldy, expensive, and unnecessarily polarizing such models are in cases involving complex environmental and economic development issues. For several years a number of forward thinking companies have voluntarily opted for an alternative collaborative approach to balancing disparate natural rescue management interests, inviting environmentalists into the decision making process in order to reach agreement with these interests prior to presenting a management proposal to regulatory authorities. Such collaborative approaches are being used more frequently in FERC relicensing proceedings.

Author(s): 

Land and Water Associates

Contact: 
Notes: 
Category: 

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