Science/Ecology

Characterization of spillway passage conditions at Ice Harbor Dam, Snake River, Washington, 2003

Year: 
2004
Abstract: 

This report describes a study of spillway passage conditions for juvenile spring chinook salmon at Ice Harbor Dam in spring 2003. The Sensor Fish Device was used to measure conditions experienced by juvenile salmon passing over a deflector installed at the base of a spillway in the dam to mitigate total dissolved gas in the spill discharge as it enters the stilling basin. The Sensor Fish Device is a waterproof, nearly neutrally buoyant sensor package developed by Battelle with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy

Author(s): 

Carlson, T.J., Duncan, J.P., Gilbride, T.L.,Prepared by Johnson, R. L., B. G. Gray, S. L. Blanton, J. P. Duncan, R. W. Gilbert, G. A. Anderson, and D. A.

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The (in)Significance of Atlantic Salmon

Volume: 
Fall/Winter 1996
Year: 
1996
Abstract: 

historical review and archeologic investigation into the abundance of Atlantic Salmon in pre-colonial/prehistoric New England. Prehistoric archeological record indicates virtual absence of atlantic salmon in the region. In order to investigate a climatically induced hypothesis for salmon appearance and disappearance, environmental an dclimatic factors affecting range shifts and the mechanisms of migration in salmon were studied. Atlnatic salmon are likely to be verey recent colonizers to North America, particlarly to New England. Today's fish an dwildlife managers appear to have largely ignored the paleoenvironmental databases that present long-term records of climatic change in concert with animal and plant species range changes, and even total extinctions

Author(s): 

Carlson, C.G.

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American Rivers produced abstract

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Joint Hatchery Review Committee - Final Report on Anadromous Salmonid Fish Hatcheries in California

Year: 
2001
Abstract: 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Between September 1999 and December 2000, the California Department of Fish and Game
(DFG) and National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) conducted a joint review of California

Author(s): 

California Department of Fish and Game, National Marine Fisheries Service

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Notes: 
Category: 

Recovery Strategy for California Coho Salmon - Report to the California Fish and Game Commission

Volume: 
594 pp
Year: 
2004
Abstract: 

he California Department of Fish and Game (Department), with the assistance of recovery
teams representing diverse interests and perspectives, created the Recovery Strategy for
California Coho Salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) (Recovery Strategy), a guide for the process of
recovering coho salmon on the north and central coasts of California. The Recovery Strategy is
organized at three scales. The first is at a broad geographic, range-wide resolution; the second
is at a large watershed scale; and the third is at a finer scale that identifies actions needed within
specific sub-watersheds.
The Recovery Strategy emphasizes cooperation and collaboration at many levels, and recognizes
the need for funding, public and private support for restorative actions, and maintaining
a balance between regulatory and voluntary efforts. Landowner incentives and grant programs
are some of the many tools available to recover coho salmon. However, the success of this
Recovery Strategy will ultimately be determined by the long-term commitment and efforts of all
who live in, or are involved with, coho salmon watersheds. The Department believes that the
commitment is there and that the execution of this plan will ultimately lead to the recovery of
coho salmon throughout its California range.
The California Department of Fish and Game (Department), with the assistance of recovery
teams representing diverse interests and perspectives, created the Recovery Strategy for
California Coho Salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) (Recovery Strategy), a guide for the process of
recovering coho salmon on the north and central coasts of California. The Recovery Strategy is
organized at three scales. The first is at a broad geographic, range-wide resolution; the second
is at a large watershed scale; and the third is at a finer scale that identifies actions needed within
specific sub-watersheds.
The Recovery Strategy emphasizes cooperation and collaboration at many levels, and recognizes
the need for funding, public and private support for restorative actions, and maintaining
a balance between regulatory and voluntary efforts. Landowner incentives and grant programs
are some of the many tools available to recover coho salmon. However, the success of this
Recovery Strategy will ultimately be determined by the long-term commitment and efforts of all
who live in, or are involved with, coho salmon watersheds. The Department believes that the
commitment is there and that the execution of this plan will ultimately lead to the recovery of
coho salmon throughout its California range.
T

Author(s): 

California Department of Fish and Game

Contact: 
Notes: 
Category: 

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