Policy/Law

Review of solutions to global warming, air pollution, and energy security

Source: 
Energy and Environmental Science
Volume: 
2
Year: 
2009
Abstract: 

This paper reviews and ranks major proposed energy-related solutions to global warming, air pollution mortality, and energy security while considering impacts of the solutions on water supply, land use, wildlife, resource availability, reliability, thermal pollution, water pollution, nuclear proliferation, and under-nutrition. To place electricity and liquid fuel options on an equal footing, twelve combination of energy sources and vehicle type were considered. The overall rankings of the combination (from highest to lowest) were (1) wind-powered battery-electric vehicles (BEVs), (2) wind-powered hydrogen fuel cell vehicles, (3) concentrated-solar powered-BEVs, (4) geothermal-powered-BEVs, (5) tidal-powered-BEVs, (6) solar photovoltaic-powered-BEVs, (7) wave-powered-BEVs, (8) hydroelectric-powered-BEVs, (9-tie) nuclear-powered-BEVs, (9-tie) coal-with-carbon-capture-powered-BEVs, (11) corn-E85 vehicles, and (12) cellulosic-E85 vehicles. 

Author(s): 

Mark Z. Jacobson

Contact: 
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Listen to the River: An Independent Review of the CVPIA Fisheries Program

Year: 
2008
Abstract: 

A independent science panel review concludes that the California's Central Valley Project Improvement Act's salmon doubling program has failed to achieve its goal for the number of reasons. The panel also makes a number of recommendations. 

Author(s): 

Cummins, Ken; Chris Furey; Albert Giorgi; Steve Lindley; John Nestler; John Shurts  

Contact: 
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Climate Change and Water Resources Management: A Federal Perspective

Source: 
USGS- Circular 1331
Year: 
2009
Abstract: 

Many challenges, including climate change, face the Nation’s water managers. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has provided estimates of how climate may change, but more understanding of the processes driving the changes, the sequences of the changes, and the manifestation of these global changes at different scales could be beneficial. Since the changes will likely affect fundamental drivers of the hydrological cycle, climate change may have a large impact on water resources and water resources managers.The purpose of this interagency report prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation), and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is to explore strategies to improve water management by tracking, anticipating, and responding to climate change. This report describes the existing and still needed underpinning science crucial to addressing the many impacts of climate change on water resources management.

Author(s): 

Brekke, Levi D., Julie E. Kiang, J. Rolf Olsen, Roger S. Pulwarty, David A. Raff, D. Phil Turnipseed, Robert S. Webb, and Kathleen D. White  

Contact: 
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