dam removal

Demolish It and They Will Come: Estimating the Economic Impacts of Restoring A Recreational Fishery

Source: 
Journal of the American Water Resources Association
Volume: 
44 (6)
Year: 
2008
Abstract: 

This paper presents the results of an ex post survey of recreational anglers for the lower Kennebec River, post-Edwards Dam removal. To the best of our knowledge, this study represents one of the first ex post analyses of fisheries restoration from dam removal. We find significant benefits have accrued to anglers using the restored fishery. Specifically, anglers are spending more to visit the fishery, a direct indication of the increased value anglers place on the improved fishery. Anglers are also willing to pay for increased angling opportunities on the river. These findings have policy implications for other privately owned dams that are currently undergoing relicensing and ⁄ or dam removal considerations. Our findings may also hold implications for fisheries that have deteriorated due to historic dam construction.  

Author(s): 

Robbins, Jesse Lance and Lynne Y. Lewis

Contact: 
Notes: 

Public Input Sought in Removal of Hydroelectric Dams

Six years ago, Traverse City Light and Power, the owner of the hydroelectric projects on the Boardman River decided that the economic and environmental benefits to be gained by discontinuing to operate the projects would be greater than the benefits provided by power generation.

States: 
Region: 

American Rivers Accepting River Restoration Proposals

American Rivers recently announced the opening of the American Rivers-NOAA grant for 2009 for river restoration projects. According to American Rivers, since 2001, this partnership has provided technical and financial assistance to community based projects that aim to restore fish species by removal of stream barriers such as dams.

Grant proposals will be accepted for projects in the Northeast, Mid-Atlantic, Northwest and California only.

The deadline for submitting applications is December 3, 2008.

Region: 

Dam Removal and Historic Preservation: Reconciling Dual Objectives

Source: 
AR
Year: 
2008
Abstract: 

Too often advocates for river restoration through dam removal find themselves in the middle of a project and at odds with potential partners over matters of historic preservation. The goal of Dam Removal and Historic Preservation: Reconciling Dual Objectives is to help dam removal proponents and advocates for historic preservation work together more effectively to achieve their mutual goals, while building constructive relationships and successfully reconciling potentially competing objectives. This report combines a primer on Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act with methods for avoiding, minimizing, or mitigating the adverse effects of a dam removal project and concludes with real life case studies.Available online at https://www.americanrivers.org/site/DocServer/Dam_Removal_and_Historic_P... 

Author(s): 

Serena McClain, Stephanie Lindloff and Katherine Baer

Contact: 
Notes: 

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